April 2009 – McClellands’s Highland Single Malt

In light of the economic times, I’ve chosen a scotch with a more conservative price than the one we reviewed last month. I find that a number of the less expensive single malts I’ve chosen tend to have a cherry tone in them. Something that I generally equate with a blend.

 

The Highland is the first expression of McClelland’s that I’ve tasted, but they offer a selection distilled in each of the four regions of Scotland, which intrigues me to try the next three!

 

In the nose I found a woody peat, and a slight cherry sweetness.

 

The first thing I taste when sipping this scotch is the Scottish gooseberries noted in the tasting notes. It does remind me of a blended whiskey, but then it refines itself to a smooth buttery vanilla flavour that is quite nice.

 

The finish is definitely lasting, as promised on the container. It has a creamy tone that emphasizes the vanilla as it diminishes.

 

I always like my scotch on ice, but the flavours in this one are better enjoyed on their own. Over all this scotch is impressive when compared to its price and I will be trying others from this group.

 

McClelland’s penchant for heritage is apparent in its packaging and website. This is a distillery that is loyal to its culture, its history and its whiskey. The official website is at McClellands.co.uk.

March 2009 – Glenfarclas 21 year

The six generations of this family business has been recognized in the award of the Icons of Whiskey, Distillery of the year award.

I received a bottle of this scotch over Christmas this year. In managing the Scotch of the month club, I’ve found that people consult local liquor merchants on what to get me when looking for a present. I believe me there is no better gift than a single malt that I haven’t tasted yet. This bottle of Glenfarclas is no exception.

 

This distillery, in the heart of Speyside, has been family owned since 1805. They are proud of their history and passionate about their trade. The six generations of this family business has been recognized in the award of the Icons of Whiskey, Distillery of the year award.

 

The Glenfarclas 21  has a complex nose and once water is added a distinct malty musk is evident among toffee and sherry aromas.

 

This is the only whiskey I’ve tasted from this distiller, but is touted as their personal favourite. There is a noticeable sherried fruit to both the nose and the taste that can be an irritation for my likings, but I find it easy to accept in this drink.

 

The finish does have a slight chocolate just at the back of your throat mixed with a strawberry or cherry tone.

 

I’ve tasted this scotch on ice, straight up and with a little water. I definitely prefer it straight as this seems to keep the sherry from dominating the taste and nose.

 

This distilleries website does a wonderful job of presenting the history of the distillery as well as it’s internal workings. The official website is at Glenfarclas.co.uk.

February 2009 – Glenmorangie – The Nectar D’or

This distillery has long been a favourite of mine. However, until now I’ve only sampled their traditional 10 year old – which is said to be the most popular single malt sold in Scotland.

gmgob_non25
Glenmorangie – The Nectar D’or

Glenmorangie – The Nectar D’or is our scotch this month.

This distillery has long been a favourite of mine. However, until now I’ve only sampled their traditional 10 year old – which is said to be the most popular single malt sold in Scotland.

The Nectar D’or is extra matured or ‘finished’ in a Sauternes cask. It’s name translates to the Golden Drink of the Gods and its taste is exquisite.

It’s taste is comprised from an amazingly balanced a mix of vanilla, honey, spices and lemon flavours. On my first taste I noticed an amazing finish.

Every swallow leaves a rich caramel finish that is unsurpassed, in my experience at least. This taste really does match the golden colour of this Scotch.

Tasting notes recommend a little water to bring forth the flavours, but it is quite refined on it’s own as well.

The sixteen Men of Tain should be proud of this single malt to say the least.

There is a wealth of information on this and the distilleries other scotches online. The official website is an work of art in itself and worth looking up. That’s at Glenmorangie.com.

January 2009 – Bruichladdich 15 Year Old

Touted as Scotland’s purest single malt whisky, this Islay scotch has won 3 awards since it’s distilleries recommencment in 2000.

bruob_15yo
Bruichladdich 15 Year Old

Bruichladdich 15 year old is our Scotch this month.

Touted as Scotland’s purest single malt whisky, this Islay scotch has won 3 awards   since it’s distilleries recommencment in 2000.

The first thing I noticed about this scotch is that when you pour it, it has a slightly lower viscosity than other single malts.

It’s been noted to have a stong toasted malt in the taste with a honey tone. I would add that there is a touch of brine to this that is unique.

And I do prefer this scotch over ice.

The distillery is proud to maintain traditional methods and tools in it’s process, and there is some information about it online. The official website is at bruichladdich.com.

And a search on you tube will bring up some short, but interesting videos of the distillery.

April 2008 – Aberlour 10 Year Single Malt

Glenmorangie 10 YearSpring is here at last and with the new season in mind, I have chosen Aberlour 10 Year Single Malt Scotch as April’s Scotch of the Month!

Aberlour 10 Year
Aberlour 10 Year

Spring is here at last and with the new season in mind, I have chosen Aberlour 10 Year Single Malt Scotch as April’s Scotch of the Month! I taste this scotch for the first time, just last month and believe it has a taste that any scotch connoisseur and aspiring connoisseur can enjoy.

Aberlour 10 Year is matured in a combination of sherry and bourbon oak casks for a minimum of 10 yeaars in the Speyside region. It possesses a light golden color and has a nose of fruit and vanilla with a subtle smokiness.

When tasting this scotch I noticed it’s rich flavour contained a blend of toffee and minty characters with a minimum of peat taste. The sherry taste, while present, is almost hidden as it works with the scotch to create a whole taste that has a spicy note at finish.

As mentioned, the Aberlour Distillery is located in the Speyside region of Scotland. The pure spring water used in the distillation process comes from Saint Drowsan’s Well, which is located on the grounds of the Aberlour Distillery. Books on Scotch and Scotch Tasting

As always, please enjoy this months scotch responsibly.

For thoe of you interested in learning more about scotch and scotch tasting, or are simply looking for a great gift idea we have compiled a list of books that should appeal to anyone interested in scotch history or the art of scotch tasting. Click here to browse the listing.

February 2008 – Speyburn 10 Year Old

Glenmorangie 10 YearSpeyburn Distillery, sitting majestically in a corner of the Spey valley at the foot of the densely wooded hills on the outskirts of the quiet Highland town of Rothes.

Speyburn 10 Year
Speyburn 10 Year

I hope everyone has enjoyed their first month of this new year.

This month’s scotch selection I’ve tasted for the first time this past year. Distilled at Speyburn Distillery, sitting majestically in a corner of the Spey valley at the foot of the densely wooded hills on the outskirts of the quiet Highland town of Rothes, is Speyburn 10 Year Old.

Speyburn 10 Year Old has all the characteristics of a classic Speyside malt. Described as an intriguing dram, Speyburn is medium-bodied with a delicate, fruity character.

Please enjoy this months scotch responsibly.